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TIG welding is a type of arc welding that uses a non-consumable tungsten electrode to produce the weld. The tungsten electrode is a small, pointed piece of tungsten metal that is used to create an electric arc between the electrode and the metal being welded. This arc generates heat, which melts the metal and allows the welder to join two pieces of metal together.

During TIG welding, the welder uses a welding torch to direct the arc and the weld pool, and a filler metal may be added to the weld joint to reinforce the weld. The torch is connected to a power source, and the welder controls the heat and arc length using a foot pedal or thumb control on the torch.

TIG welding is also known as GTAW, which stands for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. It is similar to MIG welding, but instead of using a consumable wire electrode, TIG welding uses a non-consumable tungsten electrode. The shielding gas used in TIG welding is typically argon, and the welder can adjust the gas flow and amperage to control the heat of the weld.

TIG welding is a versatile process that can be used to weld a variety of metals, including steel, aluminum, and magnesium. The precision and control of the TIG welding process makes it well-suited for welding thin materials and for producing high-quality welds. A TIG welder is a specialized welding machine that is designed for TIG welding.

How TIG welding works

During TIG welding, the welder holds the tungsten electrode in a welding torch, which is connected to a power source. The welder uses the torch to direct the arc and the weld pool, and a filler metal may be added to the weld joint to reinforce the weld. The shielding gas, typically argon, protects the weld area from atmospheric contamination and helps to control the heat of the weld.

To begin the welding process, the welder strikes an arc by touching the tungsten electrode to the metal being welded and then quickly pulling it away. This creates a small, focused electric arc between the electrode and the metal, which generates heat and melts the metal. The welder then uses the torch to guide the arc and the weld pool, and can adjust the heat and arc length using a foot pedal or thumb control on the torch.

One of the key advantages of TIG welding is the ability to precisely control the weld. The welder can use the torch to carefully direct the arc and the weld pool, and can adjust the heat and the flow of the shielding gas to achieve the desired weld quality. The tungsten tip of the electrode remains cool during the welding process, which prevents it from oxidizing and allows the welder to produce high-quality welds on a variety of metals, including steel, aluminum, and magnesium alloys. The pointed tip of the tungsten electrode also allows for excellent penetration into the metal plate, making TIG welding well-suited for welding thick materials. Overall, TIG welding is a versatile and highly effective welding process that is used in a wide range of applications.

Learning how to TIG weld

Starts with understanding your TIG welding machine. A typical TIG welding rig will have three main electricity options: AC, DCEP, and DCEN. AC stands for alternating current, which is the type of electricity used in most household outlets. DCEP stands for direct current electrode positive, and DCEN stands for direct current electrode negative. These two options refer to the direction of the current flow in the welding circuit.

In AC TIG welding, the current alternates between positive and negative, which helps to prevent the tungsten electrode from overheating and allows for good weld penetration on metals such as when welding aluminum and magnesium. DCEP and DCEN refer to the direction of the current flow in the welding circuit, with DCEP being the more commonly used setting for TIG welding.

The type of electricity used in TIG welding can affect the quality and characteristics of the weld, so it is important for the welder to select the appropriate setting based on the type of metal being welded and the desired weld characteristics.

 

Without a doubt the fastest way to get started welding is to take our TIG Welding course!

 

What Supplies Do You Need to TIG Weld Metal?

To TIG weld metal, you will need the following supplies:

  1. A TIG welding machine or power source, which provides the electricity for the welding process.
  2. A TIG welding torch, which is used to direct the weld and the tungsten electrode.
  3. A non-consumable tungsten electrode, which is used to create the electric arc between the electrode and the metal being welded.
  4. A filler metal, which can be added to the weld joint to reinforce the weld.
  5. A shielding gas, typically argon, which protects the weld area from atmospheric contamination.
  6. Welding cables and clamps, which are used to connect the welding machine, the torch, and the workpiece.
  7. Protective gear, including a welding helmet, gloves, and protective clothing, to protect the welder from heat and sparks.
  8. Welding accessories, such as chipping hammers, wire brushes, and angle grinders, which are used to prepare the metal and clean the weld area.
  9. Optional equipment, such as a foot pedal or a thumb control, which can be used to adjust the heat and arc length during the welding process.

To TIG weld metal successfully, it is important to have the right equipment and supplies, and to follow proper safety procedures. With the right tools and knowledge, TIG welding can be an effective and versatile way to join metal.

TIG welding applications

TIG welding is typically used for welding thin materials, such as aluminum and stainless steel, and is often used in the automotive and aerospace industries. It is also commonly used in the manufacturing of bicycles and other small products. TIG welding is known for its high precision and ability to produce high-quality welds, making it a popular choice for applications where the finished product needs to be of the highest quality.

How TIG welding works

TIG welding is a welding process that uses an electric arc to heat and join metal pieces together. The weld is created by using a tungsten electrode which is held in a welding torch. A shielding gas, usually argon, is delivered through the torch and protects the weld from oxygen and other contaminants that can oxidize it. Heat from the arc melts the metal pieces together, forming a weld pool. The power source for the arc is adjusted to maintain a specific arc length between the tungsten tip and the metal plate being welded. In addition, a foot pedal or other device may be used to control the torch to make fine adjustments in heat input. Non-consumable electrodes allow for precise control of heat input, making TIG welding ideal for delicate work that requires exacting precision.